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A Conversation with Poker Dealer Carly George

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to deal cards for a living? Dealers cater to a broad range of eclectic personalities and work around the clock to provide the game that never sleeps. The job is fast-paced, fascinating, and not for the faint of heart. We sat down with Seattle-based poker dealer Carly George to learn her perspective on tipping, poker culture, and what she loves about the game.

PP (Poker Power): What got you interested in dealing poker?

CG (Carly George): My interest in dealing poker came from playing daily tournaments. As a regular I became friends with some of the dealers and they loved what they did. When I inquired about where to get started they began to train me. I loved the aspect of being able to participate in the game without the chance of losing money.

PP: What’s your favorite poker game to deal and to play?

CG: I’ve always loved No-Limit Hold’ em tournaments, both to deal and play.

PP: What are your favorite and least favorite aspects of your job?

CG: My absolute favorite part of dealing is being able to see all the crazy hands that people play and the way they interact with the other players. My least favorite part is when a tilted (frustrated) player is losing and taking it out on the dealer, like slamming cards and chips, calling me names, and generally trying to find ways to blame me for their loss.

PP: Do you feel like your experience as a female dealer is different from your male co-workers?

CG: There is no doubt that the female and male experience differs. Poker players are primarily male, and I’ve found as a female dealer that I generally am tipped a little better than my male co-workers. This does not apply to all players, and certainly there are male dealers who make more than me based on speed and skill. Players are generally indifferent to the gender of the person in the box as long as the job is getting done.

PP: Our readers are curious, how much should they tip their dealer?

In a lower-limit [cash] game $1 per pot is often the standard. That being said, as the size of the pot grows ideally so should the tip. I’ve received $100 for a $2,000 pot, $1 for a $7,000 pot, and $20 for a $20 pot. It goes without saying that all tips are appreciated as a dealer.

Poker Power note: In a tournament it’s courteous to tip 5% to 10% of what you win at the end. The higher-stakes the game is, the lower the tip as a percent of what you win.

PP: About what percent of players you deal to are women? How are they treated at the table?

On average I’d guess anywhere from 5% to 10% of the players are female. They are generally more respected at the table, I always notice the male players trying to converse with and being nice to the female players, even soft-playing them in heads up scenarios (betting less aggressively.)  Females against females at the table is a whole different story.

PP: Are you planning on teaching Lucy (your baby) poker when she gets older?

CG: I think I’ve already introduced her. She loves playing with the chips and cards and seems to have a knack for counting. Her father is also a poker dealer, and my dad is a player. Seems to be in the blood.

PP: What do you wish was different about poker?

CG: I wish the shuffle machines worked more efficiently and that small cards rooms were still around.

PP: Thank you very much for sharing your thoughts.

CG: My pleasure.

If you’re interested in learning more about the power of poker, you can sign up for free poker lessons taught by our amiable and experienced teaching staff. See you there.

 

Poker Power is for educational purposes and does not permit gambling in our clubs. No poker experience is required.

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